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Hunting Main Board => Firearms => Reloading => Topic started by: Morax on March 29, 2011, 07:29:17 PM

Title: not really reloading but..
Post by: Morax on March 29, 2011, 07:29:17 PM
i been thinking of delving into the area of either burning or checkering a rifle stock, any ideas or thoughts on this matter? was thinking of doing a Celtic pattern instead of the "normal" checkering, but have been undecided on this.. gimme your thoughts folks..
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: MOSPARKY on March 29, 2011, 11:51:04 PM
I say GO FOR IT !! As a start-up hobby, I don't think it's real expensive. A few checkering files, some scrap stocks from e-bay and maybe an instructional video.
 I think some WWII surplus rifles had walnut stocks, kinda plain jane grain but none the less walnut.
 Not sure what you mean by celtic design, but now that you got it in your head, you won't know til you try it for yourself.
 This could turn into quite a little money maker for you as well. Not that many folks will be willing to pay you to checker their stock, but if you set yourself up to make custom pistol grips and such, you'd be surprized how fast they can sell. The airgun market can be a good market place. There are quite a few folks offering grips and custom stocks but with the right price it's an open market and I don't remember seeing any of them offering checkered grips. Plus new models come out every year.
 Just a word of caution. Things like this are addicting. First you checker, then you start to custom make, then you try your hand at inlaying/engraving in wood then maybe metal. Who knows where it will all end, but that's how you find yourself as busy as JA.
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: Morax on March 30, 2011, 08:14:19 AM
Who knows where it will all end, but that's how you find yourself as busy as JA.

as long as i dont find myself that old :P
i have done inlay both with wood and also with metal into wood, (silver scroll, inlay of medallions) thats real easy and fun, celtic, i was meaning where the same line is used giving the illusion of over and under itself, sonthing like this
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: John Andrews on March 30, 2011, 08:48:30 AM
 ;D ;D You better hope you get as old as I am!
 It sounds like both of you gentlemen have a good idea about inlay work.
Keep at it and the business will come.

It's just about a lost art, real inlay work. I sure would like to see you go ahead with your idea, Morax. From the looks of your experience and ideas, I think you would do just fine.

A great knife maker and fella, an inlay craftsman, was the late Dr. Moran and his work is greatly sought after. He did a lot of wire inlay on his handles, along with other great examples of his work. He passed his skills on to whom ever he could, what time he had to do so.

I have done some inlay work and certainly enjoy it. BC has a couple of knives I built for him that have some inlay of mammoth ivory. His two knives do not have intricate inlay work but I have done some serious inlay work but not the over and  under type of work. I have some more work to complete for BC, a couple of knives with shrapnel inlays in the handles.

I inlayed precious gems into one knife ( 7 diamonds and rubies) and done some semi precious stone inlay work. too. Lapidary work takes time, a whole new aspect of inlay work.

When I started inlay work, I used a lot of pure silver. Back then, silver was cheap, about $4 per ounce.  :roll:
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: Morax on March 30, 2011, 12:53:09 PM
yeah silver is not cheap for the stuff i was doing, inlaying of the stones, now that sounds sorta tough, question: basically go into it like any other inlay? or are there certain tricks for the stones you gotta know/do for them? the thing i liked most was looking at the begining product then looking at the piece done and clean and ready to go....
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: John Andrews on March 31, 2011, 09:00:11 AM
I did the small inlays like regular inlays, but small stones should have sets like stones set in rings, etc., for most applications.

With a good tight fit and some Brownells AcraGlas gel under the inlay piece, the inlay piece isn't going anywhere. With today's modern power tools, inlay work is a lot easier. That, and the inlay pieces properly cleaned and roughed on the contact surfaces before installation works good for me.

Most of my inlay work is inlayed into wood.
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: Morax on March 31, 2011, 12:14:09 PM
a lot of times i found all the power tools did for me was get me into trouble faster and easier! hahah and there is something to be said about the "hands on" way of doing it, allows for the appreciation of everything, instead of just slamming it together...
Title: Re: not really reloading but..
Post by: bohicajuan on April 04, 2011, 08:02:48 PM
I think it's a great idea! Especially when you blow up your house!! :twisted: :roll: :wink:

I see you finished my silver cross that I'll be using when I'm in Transylvania. When do I get my silver bullets?

Remember! 50 rounds of .44 mag. and 20 rounds of .50BMG. I want to be as far away as I can when I shoot them werewolves.