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Author Topic: tracking  (Read 6149 times)

Offline southern sun

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tracking
« on: October 25, 2003, 06:38:23 PM »
since we're all talking about tracking, how about everyone giving any tips about this subject  :idea: 'cause if there's anything more annoying then tracking a light blood trail, i don't know what it is. :D
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Offline RealtreesWWH

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tracking
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2003, 01:28:58 AM »
I think I missed the tracking debate.lol.I've tracked alot of critters.Everything from strayed horses to wounded deer.From my experience,a blood trail that looks kinda like its been watered down is not a fatal hit.I'm talking about a fresh trail,20 minutes after the shot.Imo,when the blood can stop enough for the white blood cells to kick in,that hit is already healing.I've crawled alot of yards trailing deer.The ones I didn't find laying,I saw running 3 days later.I know we all want drop-shots,but it don't always happen like that.A little tracking skills can go along ways.I've got a good dog that can find a wounded deer when she wants to.She has never run after live deer.But she has found 2 by herself and 3 with our help.The last one we put her on,she wouldn't hunt.We tracked it ourselves and didn't find anything.I beleive the dog knew the deer was gone and she wasn't running after it.We always have leash-tained her,no running wild.lol.

I'm not sure there is a time limit to tracking.I've helped on some for a few days.Some good,some bad. 8)
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Offline Cracker11

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tracking
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2003, 07:36:55 AM »
:twisted: I guess I`ve just been lucky,only lost one Doe. It had been raining for a few day`s,witch never help`s,these deer had started to patern me so I thought I`d throw them a Curve-Ball,I knew where 3 Big Buck`s were holding up,so I got 2 Buddy`s of mine to give me an Hour to set up on an Escape Route out of a big Briar Patch,before they walked through makeing al kinds of noise{Driving}. The Buck`s must have had another Escape Route,but a huge Doe came running through,got off a good shot,arrow passed straight through with good blood on it,but I couldn`t find any blood other than in the Impact area,I watched her run over the hill,so I call for my buddy`s,we started our serch at the last place I saw her,still no blood! Found her track`s and followed them to a heavely used trail that branched off into 3 other trail`s,so we split up,none of us found any sign of blood,we looked the rest of the day,and I delt with a load of Ribbing from the guy`s about my shooting skill`s,and the only thing that kept my Shirt-Tail intact was my Bloody Arrow. So I called two more buddy`s to help in the serch the next morning,I thought for sure that with 5 of us,we would surely find her,no such luck,we serched all day and found nothing.
  A week later,I decided to go after those Buck`s again, so after being Busted by the Big Boy`s again,I decided to serch the area again,we had put up some Trail Marking Tape in the area we serched before,as I neared the area I thought she would be in,a Buzzard flew up from the Opposite side of the trail that I had been looking,there she was,she had crawled under some heavy Briar`s and died. We must have walked around her 5 or 6 times.
 So my best advice to anyone tracking a shot deer is: Look for the Heaviest,nastiest cover you can find,a place where you think"Nothing can go through there without makeing some kind of trail " that`s probly where you`ll find it. Witch make`s sence,if I were wounded by something chaseing me,that`s what I`d do !!!!!!! :twisted:
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Offline John Andrews

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« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2003, 08:21:30 PM »
What has worked well for me tracking wounded deer with little blood, is working with a partner. If the blood is just a spot once and a while, have your partner stand and "mark" where the last spot of blood is. Then you slowly and carefully scout ahead for the next sign of blood. What too many folks do is guessing where the deer is going and rush ahead, destroying the sign. You have to take your time and TRACK, rather than losing patience and messing up what sign you have by rushing ahead. I have proved this to several folks I have tracked for. One night a buddy and I tracked a wounded deer that was arrowed high. The fella that wounded it kept getting ahead of us and messing up the sign. He was absolutely positive he knew where the deer was going. Well, he was wrong! I found where the deer turned and made a 90, and crossed over some RR tracks, but "genius" that crippled the deer insisted the deer did not turn. He just HAD to be going straight ahead to a creek bed. I cussed him until he returned to us, where I pointed out the drop of blood on the RR tracks and another drop a few feet further. This same guy, the "genius", crippled several deer every year, and usually failed to find them. Sometimes they do go where you think they will go, but when a deer is being pushed he will get really elusive, as we know. Another problem with the fellow I mentioned was that his stand was way too high for him, and he didn't wait long enough before going after the deer.
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Offline Big58cal

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« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2003, 09:13:22 PM »
I don't like to track/trail them anymore, so I just shoot the things in the neck! :D   Makes "finding" them a heck of a lot easier!

Before I discovered the benefits of neck shots though, I've trailed many a deer, both mine and other peoples.  First thing after the shot, watch what the deer does.  Is it's tail up or down?  Tail down usually means a hard hit deer.  Tail up is either a miss or a lightly hit deer (usually).  If you know where on the body you hit the animal, that's going to dictate how long to wait before trailing.  If you know you hit the deer in the front shoulder or a rear leg, get down from the stand and start after the deer immediately.  Reason for this is that the hit itself, if left alone, probably won't be fatal.  If the deer lays down, it will clot and the blood will stop.  If you keep the deer moving, you keep the hole open and bleeding.  Granted, you'll probably chase if for a while, but you'll probably get the deer.  If you know you gut shot the deer, that's a 4-6 hour wait before starting trailing (weather permitting).  You've got to give the deer time to lay down and die without being pushed.  Gut shot deer don't leave much sign, and what is left is going to be really spread out if the deer is pushed.

If you don't know what kind of hit you got, wait about 30 minutes and then go inspect the hit site.  If bowhunting, inspect your arrow if it's there.  Bright red blood indicates an artery hit of some kind.  Dark blood is a vein or the liver.  Pink blood with bubbles are a lung hit.  A green or greasy substance, maybe with food particles is a gut hit.  Also notice any hair that's there.  White hair, you were low.  Regular brown hair is questionable.  You could be either a little high, low, or dead on.  Long course hair, often darker at the tip, is a spine shot.

When trailing, stay off to the side of trail as to not mess up any sign.  Take some toilet paper with you.  Put a piece or two on a limb when you find blood.  After a while, you'll get a "flight line".  You'll be able to get a good picture of what the deer was doing just by looking back at the toilet paper.  The reason for the toilet paper (instead of surveyor's tape) is that the toilet paper is biodegradeable and will desolve from rain.  If you loose the trail, search ahead a little (based on the flight line).  If you don't find anything, go back to the last blood and start making every-widening circles around the last blood.  You'll probably pick the blood up again a little further out.  I don't know what it is, but usually right before a deer goes down, they'll make a right angle turn to one side or another.  I've found this several times on some of the deer I've hit.  Also, when you're trailing, take notice of what side of the trail the blood is on.  Usually, if you're in a tree stand, you'll have a high entry hole and a low exit hole.  The blood will usually be coming out of the low hole.  If the deer doesn't start bleeding for a while, you may not have passed through, and it will take a little while for the blood to start coming out the high hole, if it does at all.  If you had just been finding blood on one side of the trail, but then start finding it on both sides, one of two things has happened.  Either there's enough blood in the cavity for it to start coming out both sides, or the deer has doubled back on the same trail.  If you're following this type of trail, and hit a dead end, more than likely, the deer doubled back.  Go back to the first place you started finding blood on both sides of the trail and go off to one side or the other and look for blood.  I've had this happen a couple of times and it will definitely mess with your head.

When trailing, always stay alert, go slow, stay quiet, and watch ahead.  The deer may still be alive and you may spot it ahead of you.
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Offline propredator

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tracking
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2003, 08:56:07 AM »
If i have to track and the blood trail gets light i will drag my foot accross the ground and make a 2 foot skid mark were ever i find the last drop and proceed slowly looking for the next drop.That way i always have a referrence point to come back to.
 What really stinks is when one heads out across a grassy field and dont bleed much,talk about the hardest place to track.
 I tracked a deer last year for 6 hours befoe i found him,he hadnt gone too terrible far but it was hard tracken across the grassy field.
 This year i arrowed a buck but it was hit high and the arrow only penatrated half way.He was up hill from me when i made the shot.I didnt think i would ever find any blood when he ran off,but to my surprise he bleed good for a spell,the arrow fell out(retractable blades) and he clotted up and quit bleeding.It was a 40 acre patch of dense woods of small trees and rabbit bryers.I looked the intire area for 5 hours and had to give up.
 The next day i went in on foot with the bow doing a slow still hunt stalk.
Well a buck came by and i had to do a little foot work to find a good shooting lane flanking him,at 30 yards i grunted and he stopped and i put one through him,he made it 30 yards and fell over.He looked a lot like the other buck but i didnt figure he was the same one.
 When i guted him a noticed a big blood clot in him.When i skinned him out later i then realized he had 2 holes on one side and one hole on the other.
 It was the same deer i had shot the day before.The arrow from the first shot had some how missed the lungs and hit the backbone but hadnot stuck in it.Aint too often ya get a second chance on the same deer.
 Wasnt no wonder i could not find him that day i was tracking him,he wasnt dead.

Offline john

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« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2004, 08:37:07 AM »
ok this may seem hard to believe,,, but in 40years of hunting i've never lost a deer. this has little to do with my tracking skills however.it reflects the fact that i'm such a lousy shot i don't shoot them unless i'm right on top of them.

Offline Big58cal

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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2004, 10:13:03 PM »
That's doing really good John.  I've only lost 2.  One was because rain washed the blood trail away on me (since that day, I don't bowhunt in the rain anymore).  The other was because of limbs deflecting my bullets!  The 3rd time I shot at the deer, he was a little over 100 yds away, and I hit him through the upper, meaty part of the neck.  Followed the blood trail on that for about 1.5 miles before I finally lost it.  The good thing is that another guy shot the deer a couple of days later.  He said that the wound from my bullet was starting to heal, so I hadn't caused too much damage.
The only purpose of bread is to hold meat!

John Andrews Is My Hero!

In all seriousness, the Marlin is a great rifle, too. I own a Model 60, one of the best rifles ever made.
Brownings are nice, but in terms of quality AND accuarcy AND ruggedness, it's hard to beat the Marlin.
California sucks that's it.

Offline John Andrews

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« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2004, 10:47:50 AM »
Big58cal makes a good point about the neck shots. An old time bowhunter relative of mine always preached neck shots and claimed he never crippled a deer. I honestly believed him. Ol' Earl killed a lot of deer and was one of the best shots I have had the pleasure of knowing. Ol' Earl is now too old to hunt, but still could but an arrow through a deer's neck.
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Offline Lopalong

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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2004, 09:58:46 PM »
Carry a spray bottle filled with peroxide.  When you get to "last blood" spray the surrounding area.  The peroxide will cause any blood to bubble, thus helping you locate those sometimes hard to see single drops.  :)
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