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Author Topic: pheasant hunting  (Read 957 times)

Offline urban dwarf

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pheasant hunting
« on: November 20, 2005, 05:22:28 PM »
im going pheasant hunting im taking a 12 gauge and my son will take a 20 gauge . i was just wondering what size of shot do you guys use to get a pheasant . i was thinking about using  4 shot but its been awhile

Offline Mad River

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2005, 06:26:19 PM »
I would say 4, 5, or 6 would be effective.
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Offline Morax

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2005, 07:11:27 PM »
depending on the coverage, i would go no lighter than a 6 shot, but if you are hunting an area with thicker covers i would go heavy with a 4/5 but thats just me  :-P
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Offline MARLIN

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2005, 11:54:31 AM »
Like the above, on the above I would run no lighter than 6 on the 12 ga, but on the 20 ga I would only run the 4 shot. The 20 ga is not only smaller, but also slower, and doesn't have the impact the 12 ga has, and pheasants seem to have the feathers of turkeys.  :shock:
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Offline APRock

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2005, 09:54:05 PM »
My 12 is rigged up for deer hunting so I always use a 20 when pheasant hunting.  The loads I use are just as fast as any 12 I can find - they just have fewer pellets of like size in them.  The key, especially for a young or beginning shooter, is consistancy.  If you practice with load "A", stick with load "A" throughout the season.  If you mix it up too much too early, it becomes difficult for a beginning shooter to figure out their lead has to be different, they might have to let that bird get out further, or shoot sooner.  Throw in changing chokes and that's just another variable that can make you miss and increase frustration.  After someone shoots a lot of shells at a lot of different targets, they start to figure out that the lead on the bird is greater with those light field loads, 7 1/2's give you a more forgiving pattern but don't penetrate as much, those MAX loads take less of a lead and those 4's really tear that bird up if they are too close.

I shoot Fiochii 3in with #5's all season long for roosters.  I carry some other rounds so if we happen to jump some quail, or see a tree rat or two, I have something appropriate for them.   Then you can also go to a wetland area where you have to use non-toxic shot and that throws another wrench into the works.
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Offline MARLIN

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2005, 12:38:56 PM »
My 12 is rigged up for deer hunting so I always use a 20 when pheasant hunting.  The loads I use are just as fast as any 12 I can find - they just have fewer pellets of like size in them.  The key, especially for a young or beginning shooter, is consistancy.  If you practice with load "A", stick with load "A" throughout the season.  If you mix it up too much too early, it becomes difficult for a beginning shooter to figure out their lead has to be different, they might have to let that bird get out further, or shoot sooner.  Throw in changing chokes and that's just another variable that can make you miss and increase frustration.  After someone shoots a lot of shells at a lot of different targets, they start to figure out that the lead on the bird is greater with those light field loads, 7 1/2's give you a more forgiving pattern but don't penetrate as much, those MAX loads take less of a lead and those 4's really tear that bird up if they are too close.

I shoot Fiochii 3in with #5's all season long for roosters.  I carry some other rounds so if we happen to jump some quail, or see a tree rat or two, I have something appropriate for them.   Then you can also go to a wetland area where you have to use non-toxic shot and that throws another wrench into the works.


Well said on the shooting pratice, your also right on the damage which is done by bigger shot if the bird is hit wrong. But I want to add that the hunter better check his or her state laws about carring mixed shot loads(toxic, non toxic), I know that in V.t. it is illegal for the hunter to carry lead shot if he is hunting waterfowl, they state wardens don't care if they were there in case of a occasionally upland bird. This state figures non-toxic should be the only shot carried when waterfowling.
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Offline APRock

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Re: pheasant hunting
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2005, 07:21:23 PM »
Well said Marlin.  In Iowa, it isn't so much what you are hunting as WHERE.  There are certain areas that no matter what you are going after you HAVE to use Non-Toxic shot in your shotguns(Deer hunting with slugs being the only exception).  Woe to the hunter who forgets and leaves a shell or two of lead shot in the vest/jacket! If I go pheasant hunting up by the Iowa Great Lakes I don't even put lead shot in my Jeep, not gonna take the risk.
I refuse to get into a battle of wits with an unarmed person.

 


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