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Author Topic: How to debone / butcher / work up a deer Part I  (Read 24567 times)

Offline Gutpiles

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How to debone / butcher / work up a deer Part I
« on: January 14, 2007, 07:28:46 PM »
We've broken this section into two parts to help with the download time.

All information and pictures contained in this section are the property of Big58cal and may not be reproduced in whole or in part, without written permission from the man himself.    


HOW TO DEBONE A DEER Part I

Before we start this, Iím in no way a butcher!  I donít know all of the different cuts of meat or how to cut them up.  The following is just the easiest way Iíve found to get the most meat out of a deer.  If you really want to know how to cut the different types of meat (sirloin, top round, etc.), I would suggest getting some type of video showing the process.  If youíre like me and really donít care that much, as long as itís meat, then the following is how you do it.

Before you get started, have a couple of knives, something to sharpen them with, a small saw of some sort (I use a regular hack saw), a scrap bucket, and something to put the meat in.  I use a cooler and soak the meat for a few days (more on this at the end).

Once youíve got your deer skinned, now you can start taking out the meat.  Start up near the pelvic bone and the back legs.  There are two areas of skin that youíll want to cut loose on each side.  Cut these loose and let them fall down out of your way.  Where the knife blade is sitting is where youíll want to start your cut.  Donít cut in toward the spine too deep in that youíll cut the tenderloins (what youíre going after).




After youíve got the two areas cut and out of the way, now youíre going to cut out the tenderloins.  The tenderloins lie inside the body cavity, on either side of the back bone.  My fingers in the picture below are pointing to the two tenderloins.




To get these two pieces loose, use your thumb or finger and run it along each side of the spine, freeing the loins from there.  You may also need to use your knife a little if you canít get it loose with your fingers.  Once itís loose from the spine on the inside, do the same with the outside area and back part.  Once youíve gotten it loose, you should be able to stick you hand completely around behind the tenderloins.





Run your hand up and down the backside of the loin to free it.  It will still be connected on both ends however.  Use your knife and cut it loose at either end.  Repeat the process for the other loin.  When youíre done, you should be able to see the backbone pretty easy and youíll have two hunks of meat like is in the picture.






The next step is to cut out the backstrap.  In the picture below, my thumb and middle finger are on the points of the pelvic bone.  Make horizontal cuts on either side, just below the points of the pelvic bone, from the spine out.






Now make cuts from your first cut, on either side of the spine, going down toward the shoulders.




Start up at the top and with you knife, fillet the meat away from the rib and spinal bones.  Once you get it started, it will be pretty clear what piece of meat youíre after and where to cut




Just keep filleting the meat away from the bones all the way down.  Youíll have a rather large chunk of meat start to roll out.




As youíre cutting, youíll find that the backstrap is still connected to tissue on the sides of the ribs.  Just fillet this fat and membrane away from the backstrap.




Keep working this piece of meat out on down to the base of the neck.  When youíre done, youíll have a rather large chunk of meat.  Some people call this the tenderloin, but it is backstrap, and is one of the better cuts of meat on the deer.




Repeat the process for the other side.




Once youíve gotten the backstrap out, itís time to cut the front legs/shoulders off.  Push the front legs apart.  Youíll notice that thereís somewhat of a pocket or void between the leg and the rib cage.  You can also feel where the shoulder meat is next to the rib cage.




Make a cut right along the rib cage.  Youíll see and feel the shoulder start to pull away from the ribs.



Keep making cuts to free the shoulder.  This isnít an exact science, so youíll learn as you do it.  Below is the end product.  Repeat the process for the other side.





Now, with the shoulder laying on a hard surface, start to cut the meat away from the bone.  With the shoulder lying with the inside section up, my fingers are pointing at where youíll want to start cutting next to the bone.  Fillet the meat away from the bone on the lower section of the leg, working your way up.




Now go to part II !!

All information and pictures contained in this section are the property of Big58cal and may not be reproduced in whole or in part, without written permission from the man himself.    


« Last Edit: January 25, 2007, 01:13:07 PM by Big58cal »
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Offline Big58cal

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Re: How to debone / butcher / work up a deer Part I
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2007, 07:50:53 AM »
Thanks for getting this posted Gutpiles! O0

If you've got a slow internet connection (like us poor folks in the middle of nowhere) and some of the pictures show up as a box with a red "X" in the corner, move your mouse onto the picture, right click, and go to "Show Picture".  The picture will then load.  Do this with others that also may not have loaded.
The only purpose of bread is to hold meat!

John Andrews Is My Hero!

In all seriousness, the Marlin is a great rifle, too. I own a Model 60, one of the best rifles ever made.
Brownings are nice, but in terms of quality AND accuarcy AND ruggedness, it's hard to beat the Marlin.
California sucks that's it.

Offline John Andrews

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Re: How to debone / butcher / work up a deer Part I
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2007, 09:33:41 AM »
That is awesome, BC!  O0  O0  O0
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