October 17, 2017, 10:09:54 PM


Author Topic: hey stoney  (Read 4549 times)

Offline Morax

  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • ******
  • Posts: 4307
  • hell even Monkeys can use a sharp stick
hey stoney
« on: January 20, 2007, 06:48:08 PM »
I know you keep up with this stuff.. did you hear the people who stole the deer goliath, is having thier deer farm wiped out?? there was an article in the jeffersonian paper this past week, i figure you got the scoop from being in the breedings and such..
when in doubt shoot twice

Offline Stonycreek Whitetails

  • Gut Pile B&C Freak
  • *****
  • Posts: 608
  • From the Mountains of Western Pa!!
    • SureDraw Hunting Products
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2007, 10:17:02 PM »
This guy made his bed, now he's gotta lay in it.....   

He lost the respect of the fellow deer farmers, the deer associations, along with the Pa Game Commission.   He is walking a VERY lonely road.... 
Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?"

Offline Ks_Sniper

  • Global Moderator
  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • *****
  • Posts: 3701
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2007, 12:01:34 AM »
Don't rightly know exactly what you're talking about, but if it's what it sounds like, then good riddance... >:(
When I was a child, I lived as a child. When I became a man, I put away my childish things and became a Gutpiler!

Hunting Discussion Forum and Chat on Whitetail Deer Hunting - Anti Peta - Squirrel Hunting - Bow Hunting - Bear Hunting - Coon Hunting - Fishing - Firearms - Outdoor News - Cleaning Game -  17 hmr info and more at www.gutpilestyle.com ! http://www.camouflagenation.com http://www.thehuntingfiles.com  http://wildchildhuntingwear.com  http://www.isquirrelhunt.com http://www.iwhitetailhunt.com http://www.icoonhunt.com

Offline Stonycreek Whitetails

  • Gut Pile B&C Freak
  • *****
  • Posts: 608
  • From the Mountains of Western Pa!!
    • SureDraw Hunting Products
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2007, 01:38:36 AM »
GAME COMMISSION FILES CHARGES AGAINST UNLAWFUL DEER FARM AND HUNTING OPERATION
 

HARRISBURG - As part of an ongoing investigation, Pennsylvania Game Commission officials have filed more than 2,300 wildlife-related and criminal charges against Jeffrey Dean Spence, of Cemetery Road in Reynoldsville, Jefferson County, for operating an illegal white-tailed deer farm and hunting operation.  On Feb. 14, charges were filed in the office of District Justice Richard Beck of Brookville, and a preliminary hearing has been scheduled for March 31.  If convicted of all counts, Spence faces fines and penalties in excess of $16 million.

Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officer Roger Hartless, who filed the charges and led the investigation, noted that other charges may be filed as the investigation continues.  All charges were filed after consultation with Jefferson County District Attorney Jeffrey Burkett.

Following is a breakdown of the 2,318 charges filed against Spence.

Spence was charged with 1,284 counts for allegedly selling or bartering, offering for sale or barter, conspiring to sell and barter and having in possession for sale or barter white-tailed deer or the edible parts of white-tailed deer.  It also is alleged that Spence propagated these deer at an unpermitted facility.  If convicted of these violations of the Game and Wildlife Code, Spence faces fines up to $1,027,200.

It is alleged that Spence unlawfully used a computer to sell or offer for sale the white-tailed deer being propagated at the unpermitted facility, resulting in 960 counts of unlawful use of a computer and other crimes.  If convicted of these violations of the Pennsylvania Crimes Code, Spence faces up to seven years in prison and $15,000 in fines for each count.

Lastly, it is alleged that Spence unlawfully obtained payment for selling white-tailed deer he was not lawfully permitted to sell and that he raised at an unlawful facility, resulting in 74 counts of theft by deception.  If convicted of these violations of the Crimes Code, Spence faces up to seven years in prison and $15,000 in fines for each of 10 counts, five years in prison and $10,000 in fines for each of 34 counts and two years in prison and $5,000 in fines for each of 30 counts.

"The Commonwealth imposes certain requirements and restrictions on those who raise, breed, sell and import cervids, such as deer and elk, to protect the health and welfare of our state's wild and captive deer and elk," Hartless said.  "These restrictions are designed to ensure the prevention, detection and interception of wildlife-related diseases, such as chronic wasting disease (CWD), from entering the state and impacting our wild or captive cervid herds.  By operating outside the system, Mr. Spence was placing at risk our state's wild deer and elk herds and legally-permitted facilities."

*********************************************************

KNOX, Pa. -- Rodney Miller, a deer farmer, knows how to make a buck. In 1997, he paid $900 for a five-day-old male whitetail for his breeding farm here. "He was just a lil' wee thing," Mr. Miller recalls. Six years later, the animal could be worth millions of dollars, which explains why it's at the center of a criminal investigation and a nasty court fight, and why it has the world of deer farming abuzz.

Pennsylvania has way too many deer -- more than a million -- but finding a buck in the wild with antlers worth mounting can take forever. Entrepreneurs such as Mr. Miller breed huge-antlered deer that can be hunted for thousands of dollars each in fenced preserves. Mr. Miller, one of Pennsylvania's 726 licensed deer farmers, had high hopes for his new fawn six years ago, and named it Goliath. The farmer and his
wife, Dianne, say they came to think of Goliath as both an investment and a member of the family.


As a yearling, Goliath was underweight but had an extraordinary 21-point rack. That is, his antlers had 21 branches. By the next year, Goliath had grown into his name,
weighing 250 pounds and sporting what experts say was an unprecedented 28-point second-year rack. Bucks shed their racks each winter and usually grow back bigger ones the next summer. The biggest rack on record at the time was a 44-pointer found in 1981 on a full-grown deer nicknamed the Monarch, who had died of natural causes in the Missouri wild.

The Millers began harvesting Goliath's sperm for breeding. And word spread that Goliath might be one for the whitetail record book.

Then, before dawn on Oct. 20, 1999, the unthinkable happened. Goliath was deer-napped. "When I came out to feed the deer, I saw a doe running about, outside of her pen," Mr. Miller recalls. Inside the enclosure, somewhat bigger than an acre, he discovered 16 deer missing, including Goliath. "I was hysterical, to say the least," he says. The Millers organized a search party but after five fruitless hours, the Millers called the state police, who got the Pennsylvania Game Commission and the FBI involved. Investigators found truck tracks near a hole cut in the chain-link fence. Marks on the ground suggested that Goliath had been drugged and dragged away in a tarp. "It was a professional job," Mr. Miller says.

Over the next three days, the Millers recovered 15 does, but not Goliath. They offered a $100,000 reward, but the trail grew cold -- until this past summer.
On July 29, four local deer farmers embarked on a cross-country spermshopping
trip. Before leaving Pennsylvania, Andrew Foor, Harry Strawser, William Swarey and Russell Walk decided to visit another local legend, Hercules, a 52-point whitetail living on a Reynoldsville, Pa., deer farm.

The owner, Jeffrey Spence, told the visitors that they had arrived just in time. He recently had agreed to sell Hercules for $110,000 to a Missouri deer farmer who was on his way to pick it up. Mr. Spence escorted the visitors to Hercules's pen.
"When we went in, we didn't think the buck would be that big," says Mr. Foor, one of the visitors. But "this was the biggest buck any of us has ever seen."

Mr. Spence also showed off some of Hercules's previous racks. Oddly, there was no first-year rack, while the second, third and fourth-year racks had been sawed off. The fifth-year rack had been shed naturally. The sixth-year rack was on the buck's head, still covered in the velvety sheath that wraps newly forming antlers.
The four men became suspicious. "Sawing off the antlers means you're trying to hide something," says Mr. Strawser. They knew about the famous missing buck Goliath.

They didn't voice their suspicions to Mr. Spence but casually asked him for some of the photographs of Hercules they noticed lying on his porch. They drove immediately to the Miller farm, 30 miles away and asked the Millers to show them pictures of Goliath. They compared photos. The resemblance was unmistakable.

There was no time to spare. The Millers hired a lawyer, who sued Mr. Spence the next day in the Jefferson County Court of Common Pleas. A judge ordered Mr. Spence to surrender the deer to the Millers, at least temporarily, until the suit could be litigated. That afternoon, a convoy, led by Mr. Miller's pickup towing a two-horse
trailer, descended on Mr. Spence's 40-acre property. A deputy sheriff presented the court order. It took six injections to sedate the buck, now a massive 375 pounds, and four men, Mr. Spence included, to heave it into Mr. Miller's trailer.

But Mr. Spence didn't give up. He had accepted a $20,000 down-payment from the Missouri farmer, and in return, shortly after the four deer farmers' visit, gave the man the buck's second and fifth-year racks. Within days, Mr. Spence had his lawyer, Troy Harper, file a motion demanding the deer's return.

Spence and Harper decline to comment on how Mr. Spence came into possession of the deer. The lawyer says the buck he refers to as "Hercules/Goliath" was in his client's "proper possession." As for the sawed-off antlers, Mr. Spence says farmers sometimes do that to prevent injuries when bucks butt heads in vying for does in mating season.

In mid-August, a court-ordered DNA test was conducted. It compared flesh from the disputed buck and scrapings from its sawed-off second-year rack with scrapings from Goliath's first-year rack and a DNA sample Mr. Miller had kept.
Two weeks later, an Oklahoma lab told both sides that the DNA matched. Mr. Harper contends the DNA test was flawed and wants another round.

A hearing on his motion to have the deer returned to Mr. Spence is scheduled for Oct. 27. Meanwhile, the state police are conducting additional tests, says a spokesman who otherwise declines to comment.

In court papers, the Millers say Mr. Spence told them that he had sold some of the deer's sperm and had used some to impregnate 40 or so does. Their suit demands that he turn over all of Goliath's sperm and progeny and any money he made from selling them.

Sperm from a prized deer can fetch as much as $3,000 a dose, deer farmers say. Mr. Miller figures Goliath is good for 100 doses a year, maybe more. Even its racks are worth major money, perhaps as much as $500,000 for the current one, experts say. If Goliath lives another six productive years, he could earn several million dollars.

The drama has taken a toll on the buck. Deer shouldn't be tranquilized more than three times a year. This one was drugged twice in seven weeks, most recently to clean an antler infection. "Goliath is not out of the woods yet," says Mr. Miller, who has quit his job at a modular-home factory to tend his farm full time. "It's been tough on him."




At the conclusion of the 5- day trial in October 2005, a jury found Jeff Spence guilty of theft by unlawful taking or disposition and receiving stolen property. Both offenses are felony three crimes. At that time the judge said sentencing would be January 3, 2006. Jeff Spence was sent home to spend the holidays with his family. This was just as if a crime had never been committed. The judge said this would give the Millers time to determine the value of the Goliath, his antlers, his off spring and all the semen that had been removed and sold from this deer.

Several days before the sentencing the Millers were informed that it would be a private procedure. Not held in the courtroom and there would be no public in attendance. Well it was private and the Millerís were offered a ridiculously low amount of money as compensation for this crime.

They called it a pre-hearing restitution conference. So now in the next several months there will be a lot of paperwork and lawyers talking back and forth to determine the fate of Jeff Spence. Sentencing has now been scheduled for May 11, 2006. This will be after there is a series of restitution hearings scheduled for April 28, and May 1 and May 2.

Just a refresher in this case, Goliath was valued at a minimum of $500,000 and was missing for about 4 years. The deer was removed from the pens of Rod and Diane Miller of Knox. Rod and Diane discovered Goliath missing on Oct. 20 1999. Goliath, who was sporting a 410 6/8 Boone & Crockett rack, when recovered on July 30, 2003, from Spenceís White Oak Whitetail deer farm. It is located in the vicinity of his Hazen home. Goliath died Dec. 6 2004.

Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?"

Offline Ks_Sniper

  • Global Moderator
  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • *****
  • Posts: 3701
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2007, 02:46:39 AM »
So, did he get jail time? What kind of compensation did the Millers get?
When I was a child, I lived as a child. When I became a man, I put away my childish things and became a Gutpiler!

Hunting Discussion Forum and Chat on Whitetail Deer Hunting - Anti Peta - Squirrel Hunting - Bow Hunting - Bear Hunting - Coon Hunting - Fishing - Firearms - Outdoor News - Cleaning Game -  17 hmr info and more at www.gutpilestyle.com ! http://www.camouflagenation.com http://www.thehuntingfiles.com  http://wildchildhuntingwear.com  http://www.isquirrelhunt.com http://www.iwhitetailhunt.com http://www.icoonhunt.com

Offline Stonycreek Whitetails

  • Gut Pile B&C Freak
  • *****
  • Posts: 608
  • From the Mountains of Western Pa!!
    • SureDraw Hunting Products
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2007, 12:09:59 PM »
So, did he get jail time? What kind of compensation did the Millers get?

Man who stole Goliath ordered to pay $300,000 to victims
By HEATHER LESKANIC

JEFFERSON COUNTY RESIDENT IS ALSO ORDERED TO SERVE NINE MONTHS IN JAIL.

BROOKVILLE - A Jefferson County man convicted last fall in the high-profile theft of a valuable deer from a Knox area couple was ordered Friday to serve a nine-month jail term, pay $300,000 in restitution to the victims and get out of the deer breeding industry.

"There's not another case like this in the country" that I am aware of, said Jefferson County Judge John H. Foradora.

A jury found defendant Jeff Spence, 47, of Warsaw Township, guilty last October following a six-day trial on charges of theft and receiving stolen property.

The case centers around a mammoth whitetail buck named Goliath that was owned by Wild Bunch Ranch owners Rod and Dianne Miller.

Goliath, which is on record as the largest ever recorded in the history of the breed, was stolen from the ranch in 1999.

Friday's proceeding, which was well-attended by both supporters of Spence and the Millers, provided a healthy dose of drama.

Rod Miller said he has always vowed he would spend his "last dime seeing justice done" in the case.

"You're a thief and you're a liar," Miller told Spence. "What you put everybody through is unreal."

District Attorney Jeff Burkett's office had sought more than $1.2 million in restitution for the Millers.

That was based on how much money the buck could have made for the Millers in the deer breeding business had it not been stolen.

Goliath's antlers remain a world record in the Boone & Crockett scale. The animal died in December 2004.

A restitution hearing was held in late April after an initial sentencing date in January was postponed.

Clarion attorney Ralph Montana has represented Spence in the criminal case.

"It's a difficult case on all angles and standpoints," Montana said after the order was issued.

He said it is made more complex when considering "the caliber of Jeff Spence."

"It's out of character and doesn't fit any profile," said Montana.

A civil case is also pending against Spence, and he was formally charged in February with 2,318 wildlife-related and criminal charges for allegedly operating an illegal whitetail deer farm.

Foradora walked out of his chambers to begin the session carrying the deer's antlers.

"This was a pre-meditated crime," said Miller. "It's been proven he (Spence) stole our deer . . . he knew that was Goliath to begin with."

Authorities said Spence's buck Hercules ultimately turned out to be the missing Goliath as a result of genetics testing.

The judge asked Spence directly on Friday if he was holding to his position that he didn't know it was Goliath he had at his White Oak Whitetails deer ranch in Reynoldsville.

"Yes, sir, your honor, that is the fact," replied Spence.

At the time of the theft during the evening hours of Oct. 19, 1999, the deer was about 2 years old, weighed 260 pounds and had 28 points or antler tips.

It had been tranquilized and then dragged through a hole cut in a chain link fence, according to state police investigators.

"I've had nightmares since Goliath was stolen," said Miller. "We've had a number of sleepness nights."

Details of order

Foradora's order was lengthy.

He presided at the trial and has been involved with the case throughout its history.

The judge said he considered all aspects of the case in preparing the order.

"I know deer horns," said Foradora. "There's no way you can look at these horns, score them and not recognize them later. It was your business . . . that's how distinct these horns are."

The judge said evidence showed Goliath was ready to breed when it was stolen.

It was shown that Spence sold a progeny of Goliath's the next year, said Foradora.

The jury issued its finding, he said, and "I would say there is substantial and overwhelming evidence to convict."

The defendant is to serve nine months in the county jail followed by three months house arrest with electronic monitoring.

A probation term of 13 years will then take effect.

He is also to pay court costs and a total of $6,337 to Burkett's office.

Foradora's order also said the defendant and his wife will not be allowed to spend any amount of money totaling more than $250 without permission from the Jefferson County adult probation department.

He will also auction off all the deer on any property he owns or has interest in as soon as possible and get out of the deer industry.

"The proceeds will go directly to restitution," said Foradora.

Spence must remove all deer advertising from his Internet Website and not have any contact with the Millers or go to their property.

Foradora said the defendant will not be allowed to be involved with any wildlife business that is permitted through the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

In addition to the $300,000 restitution amount to the Millers, Foradora said he would be awarding the couple samples of Goliath's semen for a value of $140,873.

Spence's monthly restitution payment will be $1,700, according to the judge.

He said the defendant will be able to afford the amount due to his property and assets.

And, the judge warned him against violating any part of the order.

"I'll give you the maximum state sentence" if that occurs, said Foradora.

"Jail time is deserved and you do not show any remorse or any type of indication as to the seriousness of the crime," he said.

Foradora said it was compassion for Spence's wife, Karen, and children that curtailed a stiffer sentence.

Montana had argued for an alternative sentence, saying there are two reasons for someone to be sent to prison.

"To protect society from a bad person and to protect a bad person from himself," said the attorney. "Neither of those apply in this case."

Spence spoke briefly to Foradora before the order was given.

He said he has attempted to live his life in a way that would reflect well on himself, his family and friends.

Reaction to sentence

Burkett said he believed the sentence is fair, thoughtful and balanced.

The judge "could have been far more harsh," said the district attorney.

Spence was looking at the possibility of up to a 16-month state prison sentence, he said.

"He executed leniency and compassion," said Burkett. "He was definitely in the hot seat. It was not an easy day for the judge."

The case had a serious effect on the victims, he said.

"This (deer) was a large part of their retirement," said Burkett.

He referred to previous statements from members of the community that Spence was considered a truthful individual.

Spence "has admitted not telling the truth," he said. "He will say whatever is in his best interest."

Dianne Miller said she now feels "relief that it's over."

"That's closure," she said.

She and her husband declined to comment on the restitution amount that was offered.

Rod Miller told the judge someone else helped Spence with the theft.

"He's covering up for the rest involved," he said.

Foradora said he had received dozens of letters from those on either side of the case.

He also read parts of a letter sent by one of the jurors who heard the case.

The juror said the panel had not needed four and a half hours to reach a guilty verdict.

There was one person on the jury who hadn't wanted to hurt the defendant's family, according to the letter.

"We kept looking for something that wasn't there," it said.

Defense considers appeal

Spence started his jail sentence on Friday as ordered by the judge.

Montana had asked that it be delayed until July 16 so that he could review his client's appeal rights.

"He's been on unsecured bail," said the attorney.

The defense will be given 10 days in which to file a post-sentence motion.

Or, a direct appeal can be filed with the state superior court within 30 days.

Foradora said Spence would have to post $500,000 cash bond by the end of the day to remain free.

The defendant's wife said he won't be able to attend their daughter's high school graduation on June 25.

Foradora responded that he may consider a furlough in that matter.

Montana said he plans to review the court documents before making a decision whether to appeal.

A decision will likely be made next week, he said, and an appeal would probably be made with the state superior court as opposed to a post-sentence motion
Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?"

Offline Ks_Sniper

  • Global Moderator
  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • *****
  • Posts: 3701
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2007, 12:46:56 PM »
I'm sorry... I know to many $300K is a pretty big chunk of change, but considering the estimated amount of money lost, not to mention the loss of the deer permanently due to this man's actions... a paltry $300K is pocket change compared to what I would have deemed as fair. It may have just been a deer, but I'm certain if this would have been an original picasso that the sentencing would have been harsher and the retribution much stiffer.

Did he make a mistake? You bet... Did he know the value of the deer? I'd wager he did... 9 months is stupid, in my view. Why should this man be treated any differently than someone who robbed a bank, committed identity theft, or something else major enough to land major jail time. It was just a deer, yes... but it was also these people's nest egg.

Ooooohhh... This really burns me... >:(
When I was a child, I lived as a child. When I became a man, I put away my childish things and became a Gutpiler!

Hunting Discussion Forum and Chat on Whitetail Deer Hunting - Anti Peta - Squirrel Hunting - Bow Hunting - Bear Hunting - Coon Hunting - Fishing - Firearms - Outdoor News - Cleaning Game -  17 hmr info and more at www.gutpilestyle.com ! http://www.camouflagenation.com http://www.thehuntingfiles.com  http://wildchildhuntingwear.com  http://www.isquirrelhunt.com http://www.iwhitetailhunt.com http://www.icoonhunt.com

Offline Stonycreek Whitetails

  • Gut Pile B&C Freak
  • *****
  • Posts: 608
  • From the Mountains of Western Pa!!
    • SureDraw Hunting Products
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2007, 06:43:45 PM »
I'm sorry... I know to many $300K is a pretty big chunk of change, but considering the estimated amount of money lost, not to mention the loss of the deer permanently due to this man's actions... a paltry $300K is pocket change compared to what I would have deemed as fair. It may have just been a deer, but I'm certain if this would have been an original picasso that the sentencing would have been harsher and the retribution much stiffer.

Did he make a mistake? You bet... Did he know the value of the deer? I'd wager he did... 9 months is stupid, in my view. Why should this man be treated any differently than someone who robbed a bank, committed identity theft, or something else major enough to land major jail time. It was just a deer, yes... but it was also these people's nest egg.

Ooooohhh... This really burns me... >:(


Many in the deer industry feel the same way as you do. Yes, it was just a deer, but to the folks that make a living raising deer, this buck was a living picsaso.  With semen sales that hit $5000 per straw, each collection would gross a hefty half a million dollars.  That is just one collection and not taking into consideration offspring values.


So yes, this guy has gotten off with a basic slap on the wrist.  >:(

Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, "I think I'll squeeze these dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?"

Offline Big58cal

  • Global Moderator
  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • *****
  • Posts: 14238
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2007, 07:39:56 PM »
There's still the Civil suit.................... O0
The only purpose of bread is to hold meat!

John Andrews Is My Hero!

In all seriousness, the Marlin is a great rifle, too. I own a Model 60, one of the best rifles ever made.
Brownings are nice, but in terms of quality AND accuarcy AND ruggedness, it's hard to beat the Marlin.
California sucks that's it.

Offline Eric Hazelip

  • Gut Pile Guide
  • *****
  • Posts: 465
  • The force is strong with this one
Re: hey stoney
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2007, 01:39:12 AM »
Stoney any chance you have any pictures of this deer? I have heard about him but have never seen
All who resist will die

 


Facebook Comments