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Author Topic: Fletching  (Read 3353 times)

Offline Techno

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Fletching
« on: April 29, 2007, 11:55:51 PM »
I`m having an issue with my recurve.It would seem to me thet aither my fingers are causing the string to move the arrow and cause it to shoot wild or the plastic fletchings are causing this.I feel the fletching may just be the problem and think feather fletches would be a better choice.I`m also getting a release.Any opinoins?

BBF

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2007, 12:13:15 AM »
I am thinking that folks have shot bows for thousands of years without a release and would have been happy with plastic fletching if it was available. :wink:

I am gratified that some guys still use traditional gear instead of mostly ugly contraptions that I see now.

Offline Techno

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2007, 12:16:34 AM »
 ;D ;D

So what your really saying is I suck and need more shoot.BTW I only use it for frog`s and don`t shoot a bow other wise.

Offline Mad River

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2007, 09:23:24 AM »
Dude,

You need to switch to feathers not vanes.  Shooting a recurve off the shelf with plastic vanes will give you nothing but headaches and poor arrow flight.  The feather fletches will provide more give and will compress when contacting the bow.  Also, make sure your nock point is in the proper place and make sure your arrows have enough spine for the weight of the bow.  Easton has a bunch of charts on their site you can use for reference, if you are shooting aluminum.  If you are shooting cheap wooden arrows, you could be plagued with problems relating to improper spine and variations in arrow weight.

The key to getting good with a recurve is making sure all of the arrows are the same weight, have the same spine, and are all fletched the same, with feathers.  You also need to make sure you are drawing and holding with your back muscles and not you arm muscles.  Also, make sure you are releasing from the same point every time, try putting the tip of your middle finger in the corner of your mouth each time you shoot, as a point of reference.  Make sure you don't have a death grip on the bow either, hold it just tight enough that it won't fly out of you hand.  After you loose the arrow, keep the bow in in the same position, do not lower or raise it, until you are done watching the arrow fly all the way to the target.

If you want to discuss things further, let me know, and we can talk on the phone some evening.
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Offline Techno

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2007, 03:28:21 PM »
Shooting a recurve off the shelf with plastic vanes will give you nothing but headaches and poor arrow flight. 


Sound like you know just what i`m talking about!!

Offline Big58cal

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2007, 03:54:51 PM »
Tech, if you're going to be around water, stick with the plastic vanes.  First time the feathers get wet, they're going to be useless.  You can also get a little spring-type rest to shoot off of instead of putting the arrow straight on the shelf.  Flipper Rest is about the main one that comes to mind.  Really simple and cheap, but they do a good job.  Also, with the limited amount of shooting you're going to be doing, I wouldn't mess with a release.  Just something else to loose in the water. O0
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In all seriousness, the Marlin is a great rifle, too. I own a Model 60, one of the best rifles ever made.
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Offline Techno

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2007, 05:02:45 PM »
Tech, if you're going to be around water, stick with the plastic vanes.  First time the feathers get wet, they're going to be useless.  You can also get a little spring-type rest to shoot off of instead of putting the arrow straight on the shelf.  Flipper Rest is about the main one that comes to mind.  Really simple and cheap, but they do a good job.  Also, with the limited amount of shooting you're going to be doing, I wouldn't mess with a release.  Just something else to loose in the water. O0

I thought about a rest but didn`t know if I could get one for the recurve.I will look into that.I had a release that velcro-strapped to your wrist.I can`t for the life of me find it though.After 2 moves it`s not hard to see why though ;D

Offline Big58cal

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2007, 05:33:22 PM »
Yep, you can get a flipper rest for the bow.  It's just got a little adhesive pad that sticks to the side of the bow.  Personally, I wouldn't mess with the release with what you're going to be doing.  Mud, moss, sand, etc.  None of that stuff works very good when combined with a mechanical release aid. O0
The only purpose of bread is to hold meat!

John Andrews Is My Hero!

In all seriousness, the Marlin is a great rifle, too. I own a Model 60, one of the best rifles ever made.
Brownings are nice, but in terms of quality AND accuarcy AND ruggedness, it's hard to beat the Marlin.
California sucks that's it.

travo

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2007, 10:47:51 PM »
gotta go with mad here. a flipper rest will still have contact problems when using plastic vanes. the problem is, a flipper rest still holds the arrow against the riser, and with your fletcing being only 120 degrees apart from each other, it WILL contact the riser. the only way to shoot plastic fletching cheaply is a prong rest, that is, a rest that cradles the arrow with 2 prongs from underneath. i is hard to mount one of these to a recurve because with most recurves being wood or laminated wood or fiberglass, you run the risk of cracking the riser when drilling the hole to attach your prong rest. i would shoot off the shelf with feather fletching. yes, the feathers will lay down when wet, but at the ranges you are shooting, it is a moot point. i use feather fletching on all my arrows, and havent noticed much of a difference, wet or dry, and keep in mind, i shoot competitively and usually place well into the top 20% in competition. i have taken 50 plus shots with wet feathers while shooting 3D tournaments in a drizzle, and not noticed any big difference. i think that the feathers get a little heavier when wet, but lay down more, which creates less drag, and therefore, about the same trajectory. perhaps it will take a little longer to stabilize the arrow wet, but not enough to make a difference. sorry,BC, been there and tried that.

Offline Techno

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Re: Fletching
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2007, 11:31:04 PM »
Dang Travo you done good!!  O0 O0

I did an image search to see what the flipper rest looks like and I did find the "prong" type.I also saw the "shelf" type like Travo mentioned.The prong type is what I would have gone for.I did see the stick on,prong type.As Travo mentioned I feared drilling into the wood and having to throw the whole thing away.I`m going to try out some better arrows with feathers and ,go against the grain, a release.After jawin mad`s ear off I dont think my problem is my paws but I want to use the release.I`m not to worried about things getting wet.In the vid I posted you can see were only shooting,at the farthest,2 yards.We went out as soon as it got dark.It was pretty easy to spot light a frog and have another guy move in.Suprisingly enough you could almost get 2 feet from them and shoot.Were only shooting hard enough to get the arrow to stick into the frog and a few inches of mud under it to hold it still.We did all of our giggin the weekend of the first bow hunt in ponds.Walking around the banks provided more kills than hitting a boat and shooting towards the bank.Once Illinois season starts brother-in-law wants to do another vid.I`m going to make sure this vid is done with more direction  ;D ;D ;D

 


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