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Author Topic: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING  (Read 24623 times)

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2008, 03:07:58 PM »
HUSKY 2D 3 WATT LED LIGHT

I was at Home Depot and I spied a new light in the flashlight section. The new torch is a HUSKY brand, which is a brand name of Home Depot. I have used some of their inexpensive lights; they are made in China and represent a good value in some models.

The new light uses two D batteries (that are included in the package) and the source of light is a three watt LED. The difference in this torch is that the switch activates three different levels of illumination.
The package lacks any instructions and doesnít even mention the output of the light or the run time. So I am guessing that the first mode (the first click) is a 12 lumens light, second click at 40 lumens and the last click about 80 lumens.

The idea of having three different levels is good, it will conserve battery juice when you just need a little light for illumination, and at the same time, the other two settings are there for more lumens when you need to reach farther or put out more intensity.
As this thread is all about comparisons, I decided to pit the new HUSKY against a Maglite 2D LED 3 watt that I bought a few months ago. I purchased the Maglite from Wal Mart for $24 USD, but I think that it was on sale at the time, still price wise the two lights. Compare.

The HUSKY is ĹĒ shorter, otherwise they compare physically to each other and they weight the same, although the HUKY have a slightly smaller head.
The outside of the Husky is finished in a slightly duller anodizing than the Maglite; both lights look handsome on the outside.
In the inside the Husky shows the threads of the tail-cap, body and head very rough. Removing the head I found an adequate heat sink, although the mounting of the LED looks a little lousy. I wanted to take a look at the reflector and plastic lens, but it was not possible to remove the bezel despite my superhuman and my weight-lifter friend efforts - the bezel seems to have been super-glued in place.

The tail-cap sports a flimsy lanyard that I will not trust to hold the light for long, and looking inside at the switch, I found it very cheesy looking, more appropriate for a toy than for a flashlight. The little strip of metal where the battery makes contact with the switch, it doesnít look good either.

The Maglite 2D on the other hand, is a high quality product with butter smooth threads, a switch that will last forever and a lot of well thought-out features (cam action, self cleaning switch, etc).
The Maglite is an American product that should cost much more of what it does now. Old timers may recall that when they first show up in the 1980ís the price tag was $60 USD and that they were selling like hot cakes, the engineering of the Maglite was at that time well above any of the existing lights, including the Kel-Lite.

In the picture you can see the Maglite 2D LED on left, the Husky light in the middle, and the red one on right is a Black Bear 720 lumens, (1 Ĺ million candlepower) a custom made light that shows how much illumination we can put into a Maglite ďhostĒ 2D, with a little ingenuity, and if the people are willing to pay the price of a custom product.




Here are the beam shots for comparison, 35 yards to the fence.

HUSKY 3 watt



MAGLITE 3 watt



BLACK BEAR 720 LUMENS




My impression is that the Maglite has a much better beam, in color rendition and in intensity. Also, I can throw the beam of the Maglite much further than the Husky, even that both lights are 3 watt, the Maglite is better in quality of LED and power.
Granted - the Maglite has a 2Ē full reflector, while the Husky could be only 1 ĺ ď  that could account for the better throw, but the Maglite definitely has a whiter beam and it is more intense.


All the best
Black Bear








Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #31 on: July 20, 2008, 05:53:38 PM »
Q-BEAM MAX MILLION II
TWO MILLION CANDLEPOWER
SPOTLIGHT

I very recently bought a new Q-Beam two million candlepower spotlight. I am a big user of spotlights, in my case I use them to give demonstration of the power of the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight, in police reunions, night shots, and seminars.

When my eight month-old battery for my two million candlepower Optronics spotlight gave up the ghost, I had to get a new spotlight.
I spied the Q-Beam at Wal-Mart and I bought it on the spot. It is a large spotlight with a four-and-three-quarters inch reflector, and with some extra features not available in other spotlights.
For starters, it comes with two removable batteries. One battery could be on the light while the other is charging, a good feature. Unfortunately, in my case, one of the batteries was already dead and is not recharging. I will have to return the unit and get another, hoping for better luck.

However, bad batteries are nothing new in big spotlights. It seems that the Chinese havenít gotten the hang of making lead acid batteries last any decent amount of time. I know; I have the corpses of seven spotlights to prove it (some day I will get around to rounding them up and take a picture of them).

I can safely say that I have tried all of them, and I can tell you that a quality spotlight is not available in the USA, unless you buy one of the Australianís Night Force spotlights.  Australians, with their liberal night hunting laws, know a thing or two more about night hunting and lights that the average American hunter does.

For law enforcement the panorama is different.  With the advent of the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight (12 ĹĒ long, 28 oz) a spotlight in the cruiser is no longer needed.

After all, spotlight use for law enforcement is confined to operation from the car, which is why you donít see a trooper conducting a traffic stop with spotlight in hand or chasing down a suspect with one in tow.

Coming back to the Q-Beam Max Million II, it also has another feature that was not available before in any other spotlight; a double trigger that when touched high, can activate mechanically a spring that will push the smaller part of the two-part reflector/ bulb holder, forward. This causes the focus to change to a wider flood; interesting concept, but perhaps of dubious utility. I have seen it employed in flashlights before, but by the use of two filaments positioned in the bulb envelope at different heights.

Here is a picture of the Q-Beam together with the Borealis



Unfortunately the Achillesí heel of any spotlight is the quality of its batteries. In the normal use that I give them, they never last more than 6 to 8 months, which is why I am not looking to pay more than half a century note for one, with is just what the new Q-Beam cost me at Wal-Mart.

How does it compare with the Borealis 1050 lumens (two million candlepower)?
To answer that question, I move them to the backyard of my local church, where I have a solid wall of trees and a range of 35 yards (I try to avoid solid light-painted walls that produce too much reflection and confuse the camera).

Q-Beam Max II Spotlight



Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight




Black Bear 720 lumens flashlight





The new Spotlight did well in comparison, but it is more inside the range of the Black Bear 720 lumens (10 ď long 23 oz) than of the more powerful Borealis.

 Here are the pictures for you to judge; of course the Borealis and the BB 720 are  better law enforcement tools as the side spill is bigger and the intensity and the color are brighter. Of course, you need side spill to avoid panning a tight focusí light and losing precious seconds when clearing a room or warehouse.
For those that use the Q-Beam for varmint shooting (with a partner to hold the light of course) the light will do okay up to 300 yards.

For that use you can take advantage of the red filter (at shorter distance) and the other two filters, ( blue and amber), are completely useless for varmint shooting and for any other use I can imagine, as I can not see a blood tracker using such a big spotlight with the blue filter on it.

Respectfully,
Black Bear

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #32 on: July 31, 2008, 12:28:17 PM »
THE UTG BARREL MOUNT
                                                           
                                                         
                                                                               
Hi guys,                                                                       
For  those  wanting  a barrel mount for a flashlight or laser, I have had good
results with the UTG barrel mount.                                             
Initially  purchased  for  an  AK rifle, I found out that it can be mounted in
other rifle barrels, for example, it fits perfectly in a .22 rifle and also in
a Mini 14 I have.                                                             
                                                                               
It is a tri-rail mount with three Picattiny rails that will also accept Weaver
style  rings.  My  model is the #2 mount which have two slots; the UTG is also
available  with  five slots that will accommodate the red dots scopes that are
in the market.                                                                 
                                                                               
Picture of the UTG # 2   

                                                     
                                                                                ]   
                                                                               
Another view
                                                                 
                                                                               
   
                                                                               
         
                                                                       
The UTG fully loaded with two TACM III tactical lights (one with a red filter)
and a laser.
                                                                   
                                                                               
     

                                                                               
The UTG is sold by Cheaper than Dirt and I imagine others places that cater to
tactical rifles. Just look in their catalogue in the AK accessories page.     
                                                                               
Cheers                                                                         
Black Bear                                                               





Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2008, 10:21:39 AM »
VERY INTERESTING ARTICLE BY JAMES MAURER
ON THE BRIGHTEST LIGHTS IN THE WORLD
THAT YOU CAN GET OVER THE COUNTER.

THEY ARE ALL THERE
THE TORCH, THE POLARION, THE BOREALIS,
THE SUNFORCE, ETC.

READ IT IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN LIGHTS

http://www.jamesmaurer.com/worlds-brightest-flashlight.asp

CHEERS



Offline MADDPUPPY

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #34 on: September 17, 2008, 11:20:21 PM »
i use the kelly's...K LIGHT....28 volt belt light it has a burn time of about 15-18 hour on the low side and about 2 hours on the high side....has a led walking light and a flicker switch......for the everynight cooner you cant go wrong with anything Mike Kelly builds

if you would want a diff set up just let him know what you want and he can build the light just that way

i paid 475 for mine and have a full no questions asked warr. for the first 2 yrs and parts the 2 after that

PS......on high the light will be a little hot on your head

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2008, 09:05:25 AM »
For coon I use the Wizzard II and I carry one of the Bear Cub 220 lumens and sometimes one of the  Borealis 1050 lumens for the shot.



THE NITE LITE WIZARD II
HEAD LAMP
The Raccoon hunting light

I have been using this lamp for raccoon hunting on and off for two years, so it is well proven as it has maintained the charge in the battery very well and for the purpose of raccoon hunting with dogs in the south, it has delivered a satisfactory performance.

The light has a rheostat in the top of the head lamp, so you can vary the intensity of the beam, like low when walking in the woods to high when searching in the top of the trees or shooting.

The unit comes with the cap with the holder bracket installed and a leather cable guide in the back to route your cable to the battery that is usually carried on your belt, I recommend a sturdy belt and if possible the aid of suspenders to help with the weight of the battery. The suspenders really help a lot if you donít want to cinch your belt to the point of discomfort.

In the minimum setting the battery juice will last for five hours, just about right for a night of coon hunting, as after that you and the dogs will be deadly tired.
I have found the light good for tracking blood when bow hunting, the only real issue here is to have it available when needed as it is heavy and bulky and we tend to carry a smaller and lighter hand light in the back pack, like the rechargeable Bear Cub.




The light can also be used as a hand held searchlight, as the battery plastic case has a mount for the bracket in the head. The cables are sturdy and have stood up well to snags in the briars/branches etc. and the switch that is in the bottom of the head is very well made and the action positive.
So far after this light still works like the first day, after two years the battery still hold a charge, which speak good of the quality of it, I have had others lamps running in the same kind of six volts batteries that have fizzled in a year time.

This is a good quality product from Nite-Lite, I can recommend it without reservation.
Best regards

Black Bear




« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:07:45 AM by black bear 84 »

Offline John Andrews

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2008, 10:16:14 AM »
This sure is the most informative info and comparison of lights I have ever seen, BB! Great thread!  O0
Hunting Discussion Forum and Chat on Whitetail Deer Hunting- Bow Hunting- Muzzleloader Hunting- Fishing- Firearms- Outdoor News- Cleaning Game- Deer Pictures- Fish Pictures and more at www.gutpilestyle.com !

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #37 on: October 19, 2008, 02:02:02 PM »
John,
Thank you for your appreciation of my thread.

Black Bear

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #38 on: October 19, 2008, 02:02:43 PM »
REMOTE SWITCHES
WITH PRESSURE PAD

Hi guys,
I have been using remote switches in my tactical lights that are mounted in rifles,  shotguns, and bows, for quite a few years now.
The most effective of them are the ones with a direct connection to the solder pad that touch the battery (no spring), like the ones in the TACM III tactical lights.
The reason that they are more effective is that they donít rob the system of any voltage (in the way of internal resistance) as do the ones with heavy springs.

Internal resistance is the name of the game, some of them, for example the TAC STAR pressure switch, can really make a bright lamp like the P-60, looks dim and murky, due to too much internal resistance in the design of the tail cap.

THE TAC STAR REMOTE SWITCH



A good one that I have used for years in mounting lights on my friendsí bows and rifles, is the G&P tail cap with remote.  Its design is quite good and the internal resistance is low, but it is not designed for pump shotguns as the cord is just straight and not curly.

THE G&P REMOTE SWITCH



A very good one that I discovered recently is the Aimshot curly cord remote, the spring is copper and quite light and it seems to have very low internal resistance.
I discovered the Aimshot in Cheaper Than Dirt catalogue and at a very good price ($14.97) and it has become my favorite.
I just used one in a Pelican M-6 tactical light and mounted it using a UTG Tri rail mount in an AK rifle, it does the job well.

THE AIMSHOT REMOTE SWITCH



Cheers

Black Bear




Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #39 on: October 28, 2008, 03:40:34 PM »
THE 200 LUMENS BATTLE

There are now a number of aftermarket lamps for the popular series of Surefire lights.
They will fit the Surefires series: 6P, C, Z, D, G, and maybe others.

I just received a new one that claims 290 lumens and is called a Cree R-2 (itís supposed to be even more powerful than the Cree Q-5).
I decided to do a shoot out with an assortment of lights that I have in the 200 plus lumens class. That way the members can see how they perform against each other.

Run time was not measured for lack of time and because I am running short on 123ís batteries. The bigger lights, namely the Surefire M-4 with the MN60 lamp (225 lumens for 60 minutes on four 123ís disposable batteries) and the Bear Cub from Black Bear Flashlights (220 lumens for 90 minutes on rechargeable Li Ion batteries) are big throwers and with them you can see clearly objects 120 and 150 yards away.

On the other hand the small reflectors of the Surefires G-2, Centurion 2 and Fenix T-1 are dispersing all those lumens close by, creating a great flood.
Those pocket lights will be great to use as tactical lights by law enforcement personnel, and especially good at clearing houses, while the Surefire M-4 and the Bear Cub will make great lights for car, truck and the open spaces.

The literature of the Fenix states that itís good for 200 yards, it will probably make a reflective target like a stop sign glow at that distance, but it would hardly  illuminate any other object. My perception from trials I made, is that this light as well as the others LEDís canít be count to illuminate (poorly) objects beyond 60/70 yards.


In any case, a lamp upgrade if you own a Surefire pocket light, is a good idea as any of them are more powerful than the stock incandescent lamp of 65 lumens or the stock LED lamp of 80 lumens.


The lights as they appear in the picture are, from left to right:


Surefire M-4 MN60 lamp 225 lumens for 1 hour (running on four 123ís batteries)
Bear Cub 220 lumens for 90 minutes, rechargeable
Surefire G-2 in yellow. It is 65 lumens for one hour with the stock P-60 lamp
Surefire G-2 in black, Lumen Factory lamp incandescent of 160 lumens
Surefire G-2 in green, Cree Q-5 by Deal Xtreme, 200 lumens
Surefire Centurion 2 in Jungle Camo, 290 lumens (claimed) with the Cree R-2 lamp
Fenix T-1, 225 lumens using a Cree Q-5 lamp




And now the pictures, target is 20 yards away, watch also the amount of side spill as well as the throw.

SUREFIRE M-4 DESVASTATOR 225 LUMENS



BEAR CUB RECHARGEABLE 220 LUMENS



SUREFIRE G-2 YELLOW 65 LUMENS



SUREFIRE G-2 BLACK LUMENS FACTORY 160 LUMENS LAMP



SUREFIRE G-2 GREEN, DEAL XTREME LAMP CREE Q-5 200 LUMENS



SUREFIRE CENTURION 2, CREE R-2  290 LUMENS (CLAIMED)



FENIX T-1 CREE Q-5  225 LUMENS





One word of caution with high intensity LED lights: most are not thermally regulated and they will suffer from their own heat if used for an extended period. They will get very hot and the tint will change. Short use of 5 minutes or less is recommended, especially in lights like the G-2 that has a plastic body and head.

All metal flashlights like the Surefire 6P are better at dissipating the heat, and in them a few more minutes of constant use can be achieved before the heat will damage the module.
The big heavy head of the Fenix acts as a heat sink, and this light can manage to run much longer without the heat affecting the module.

Besides, the Fenix has a second setting that will run the light at 60 lumens for 10 hours.
So, if you already have a Surefire you want to upgrade, the aftermarkets lamps are great.
If you need a new light look at the Fenix line.

If you need a truck, open spaces light, the Bear Cub is a great value as it is rechargeable and very bright as well as a 150 yards thrower.

Cheers



 


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