November 22, 2017, 06:55:58 PM


Author Topic: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING  (Read 24690 times)

Offline John Andrews

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #40 on: October 29, 2008, 10:45:53 AM »
I have one of the new Streamlight Survivor LED lights and it works great for a backup duty light. I don't have the recharge pack, I use AA rechargeable batteries. the light really packs a good wallop for my kind of work and has good battery life/working time with the 3 different modes.

It certainly has more working time than our duty issued recharge Maglites.

The clip on my Streamlight is one that will last a lifetime and is very tough built like the rest of the Streamlight. Our issued Maglights don't have the LED bulb conversion and are fragile when it comes to being dropped. A dependable light that can handle rough treatment is an absolute must with our kind of work.

Like I said, this thread rocks, black bear 84! Your lights look to be the best on the market.  O0
I got a heck of a deal on the Streamlight, got it through a pal, wholesale price. No, I can't get more at that price, got it though my pal that got two from his son.
Hunting Discussion Forum and Chat on Whitetail Deer Hunting- Bow Hunting- Muzzleloader Hunting- Fishing- Firearms- Outdoor News- Cleaning Game- Deer Pictures- Fish Pictures and more at www.gutpilestyle.com !

Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2009, 08:29:16 AM »
TERRALUX LIGHTSTAR 220
FLASHLIGHT

For the last two months, I have been using one of the Terralux Lightstar 220 lumens flashlights, which runs on two AA batteries.
This light has two settings on the click-tail cap; the first setting clicks on the light and emits 220 lumens for 1.5 hours.
The second setting of 100 lumens for 6 hours is accessed by softly pressing the rubber button switch.

The LED is a Cree RXE Q-4 and is controlled by a microprocessor for a constant light output.  When battery juice is running low, the LED will flicker to let you know that is time for new batteries.
The unit comes with two Energizer AA batteries, a lanyard and a soft nylon holster.  At an even six inches long, the light is quite portable and also features a clip to attach it to your belt or waistband.




It is very similar to the popular 3 watt 80 lumens Ray-O-Vac Sportsman Xtreme (but is slightly longer as the click tail cap needs more room for the mechanism), and the head is smaller with a small orange peel reflector.

Due to the small reflector the beam throws quite a flood despite the 220 lumens figure.  Small reflectors don’t really have much throw no matter how many lumens you make the light puts out. However, it is quite adequate for most chores inside a house and practical, too, for walking the dog or a walk in the woods.

LIGHTSTAR AT 20 YARDS WITH THE 220 LUMENS




LIGHTSTAR WITH THE 100 LUMENS SETTING






The really nice thing about these lights are that they are very inexpensive to feed as they use common AA batteries. As I use rechargeable AA batteries in all my lights, it is even more inexpensive to use.
The dark green anodized body is quite resistant to scratches as the light is still like new even after a couple months of sharing my pocket with keys and coins.

Cost of the light varies depending where you buy it, but it is around $35 to $40 USD; your best bet is to Google it to see who has a special on it.
I like this light to the point of recommending it to anybody that is looking for a light with these characteristics.  The light is as good as the Ray-O-Vac Sportsman with the added power of the 220 lumen setting.
Cheers.
Black Bear





Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2009, 12:44:48 PM »
WHEN A LUMEN IS NOT A LUMEN

A lumen is not a lumen when somebody intends to throw a big bunch of them out of a small reflector the size of a dime or nickel. At least it seems to be that way.
It used to be easy to tell the power of a light by the lumens figure, not anymore. You could be an experience user of lights, say a policeman that had used for years a 200 lumens Magchager and is well acquainted with its capabilities. Now he reads about this small light the size of a thumb that also outputs 200 lumens and is all excited to get the new marvel.
He does and is promptly disappointed because the small light seems to throw a good amount of light, but all close by, and is nothing that can compare with his duty Magcharger that can illuminate objects at 100 yards.

Besides emitters in the 200 lumens bracket can kill themselves with the heat that they produce when they are used in small lights with poor heat sinking. It is mostly a novelty thing and it should be used with caution. Some of them come in lights with multiple settings, and that is fine when the literature advice you to use the 200 lumens sparingly, and you follow that advice.

To illustrate the point, here are a couple of pictures of beam shots at 20 yards, you can clearly see the superiority of the Bear Cub (reflector size 2”) over the Lightstar 220, (reflector the size of a dime)  even when both lights are rated at 220 lumens.

LIGHTSTAR 220 LUMENS AT 20 YARDS



BEAR CUB 220 LUMENS AT 20 YARDS


   

Some manufacturers wishing to quote big numbers are now putting clusters of these small reflectors on duty size flashlights. Mind you these clusters that are from three to four are still all small reflectors with limited throw.
So, somebody putting a cluster of four reflectors in a big head can claim 800 lumens, but you know better now, knowing that those 200 lumens for each reflector are not really behaving like real lumens!

Unfortunately I don’t have one of those lights to prove the point. But I can get my own cluster of lights in the 200 lumens bracket, and demonstrate by picture what can you expect.
I have here two of the Lightstar220 lumens, plus a Fenix P3D of 205 lumens and an Ultra Fire with Rebel emitter of 200 lumens, all of which together in a cluster will throw the figure of 845 lumens.
The opposite number is a Black Bear 720 lumens flashlight, a light that is 10” long and weights 24 oz. and uses a 2” reflector that can throw several hundred of yards with a strong white light.

HERE IS THE PICTURE OF THE CONTENDERS



The distance for both beam shots is in this case 35 yards to the target (The no trespassing sign tacked in the tree). The camera is 20 yards from the target.

CLUSTER OF REFLECTORS 845 LUMENS




BLACK BEAR 720 LUMENS ONE REFLECTOR 2”



Observe how the beam of the 720 lumens light travels beyond the range of the cluster lights, illuminating objects that the cluster lights are not capable of showing.
So, if you are in the market for a new light, this use of small reflectors in clusters to boost lumens figures is something you should be aware off.

Cheers

 Black Bear



Offline black bear 84

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #43 on: March 03, 2009, 12:35:24 PM »
NEW BULB FOR THE BOREALIS FLASHLIGHT
750 LUMENS FOR 75 MINUTES

As you may know the Borealis 1050 lumens flashlight is the most powerful military/police flashlight in use today.

The Borealis will make 1050 lumens for 50 minutes on rechargeable batteries. Now a new bulb is available which will run the light for 75 minutes with a drop of only 300 lumens.

Lights in use by police today are the Magcharger, the Stingers, the SL 20 up to 200 lumens, the Ultra Stinger-295 lumens, the Pelican 7060-135 lumens, and the Fenix TK series up to 240 lumens.

Military forces use a variety of Surefires as weapon lights with 120 lumens and hand held like the Surefire M-4, 350 lumens and the Surefire M-6 at 500 lumens.
So, the above statement of the Borealis been the most powerful is not an exaggeration, many are been used daily by police and many are doing tour of duty in Afghanistan and Iraq.

What the new bulb does is extend the run time to 75 minutes without reducing drastically the output.

As no other duty flashlight with the same lumens is available, I decided to conduct a shoot out against a big two million candlepower spotlight, the one at hand was an almost new Brikmann Q beam Max million II (two million candlepower) with a reflector of five inches wide and a big bulb of 75 watt.
All this in competition to a bean sized 30 watt bulb and two inch reflector of the Borealis.

DAVID AND GOLIATH




FIVE INCH VERSUS TWO INCH




This particular Borealis has a Light Stippled reflector, a reflector designed to give a good balance between flood and throw, but given the semi custom character of the Borealis three other reflectors are available, smooth for maximum throw, orange peel for just a little less throw but more flood (also called side spill) and a medium stippled reflector designed for a big flood but with the range limited to 100 yards.

As the night was bitterly cold I decided to take the pictures and shoot the beams right out of my second story kitchen window, with the short tripod legs resting in the kitchen sink.
The target is the white and blue cabana which is the second building in the picture after the fence.

The target is 74 yards from my window, with back trees as much as 85 yards (they are still visible with both lights).

Due to the big reflector in the spot light, the beam is concentrated in the center of the picture and illumination from the side spill is not as great as it is with the Borealis 750 lumens bulb.

Observe both pictures and you will see more area illuminated by the Borealis 750 lumens bulb, than is illuminated by the two million candlepower spotlight.
Still the intensity of both beams is similar at the center of the target area.

Q-BEAM MAX TWO MILLION



BOREALIS 750 LUMENS 75 MINUTES BULB




In conclusion the new Borealis bulb of 750 lumens is worthy for those that will want a run time of 75 minutes. Even after loosing 300 lumens the Borealis still is the most powerful flashlight used by the police and the military.

The light can be ordered with the 1050 lumens bulb installed and the spare as the 750 lumens or vice-versa.  You can also order the reflector most appropriate for you work, the only light in the Industry that offers you a choice of four reflectors.

Cheers.

Black Bear







turkeynutz

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #44 on: March 03, 2009, 01:03:00 PM »
Sweeeet! O0 But I bet that wears out a battery right quick huh?

Offline Techno

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #45 on: March 03, 2009, 03:45:25 PM »
Sweeeet! O0 But I bet that wears out a battery right quick huh?

Have you checked the prices on some of these lights  :shock:
For the amount of time they burn you would think they would be cheaper.Lord knows Bandit and Valley creek have lights about the same price yet they burn alot longer.

turkeynutz

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #46 on: March 03, 2009, 04:41:41 PM »
Figures.... I use a mini-mag. works good for me. O0

Offline Techno

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #47 on: March 03, 2009, 07:48:33 PM »
My 2D Mag worked well enough.I then bought a 4D mag for shining the tree and us a 2AA Mag for walking.Add rechargeable batteries and BAM!!

turkeynutz

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #48 on: March 03, 2009, 11:08:57 PM »
There you have it. O0 Like buyen a 1200 dollar bow when you can get the same kill with a 300 dollar one! O0 O0

Offline Techno

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Re: LIGHTS FOR HUNTING
« Reply #49 on: March 14, 2009, 12:28:02 AM »
There you have it. O0 Like buyen a 1200 dollar bow when you can get the same kill with a 300 dollar one! O0 O0


This here light is better suited for coon hunting.
http://www.banditlights.com/lights/2020_volt_box.htm

Try and get the time out of those "overpriced" flashlights  ;D

 


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