October 17, 2017, 04:40:51 PM


Author Topic: Broadhead grain'age question  (Read 1267 times)

Offline deertag

  • Applied for my club membership...
  • ***
  • Posts: 68
Broadhead grain'age question
« on: November 19, 2008, 09:41:51 PM »
Im just starting bow hunting and my one of my buddies is tellin me to buy 100 grain and the other says 125 grain. Im shootin 350 arrows and pullin 65-70 pounds. Wich one do you recomend the best fit for 350 arrows? Would anything bad happen if i used 100's or 125's with 350 arrows?

« Last Edit: November 19, 2008, 09:46:31 PM by deertag »
this is my rifle this is my gun this is the toy i use for fun!!!!

Offline Tenderfoot

  • Hardcore Carnivore with Gut Pile Style!
  • ******
  • Posts: 1566
  • John Andrews is my hero
Re: Broadhead grain'age question
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2008, 11:21:35 PM »
Are those un-labeled numbers you are quoting the spine on the arrows, or the weight? If that is the spine and your bow is fast enough, very bad things will happen. You can actualy snap an arrow shaft and hurl the shards and what is left through your hand if you shoot too flimsy an arrow with too heavy a head out of that relatively heavy draw bow. Most 70 pound bows perform well with the upper-level stiff spines. I shoot the medium spines out of my 58#. Even if the arrow doesn't explode, the wrong spine-ing will kill your accuracy all to heck. As for arrow weights you can use what you'd like out of a 70# bow. The 125 should give you more penetration on a critter, but it is going to drop in trajectory sooner since it will be slower due to its mass. the 100 heads will surely take down a deer, and fly flatter for a longer distance(theoretically, you may find after testing that it is impercevabley small). Buy both grains and see which you like. I like the flat-shooting of lighter heads. Any amount of energy hitting the boiler room will take them down...if that heavy head hits a tough spot it might penetrate the shoulder easier, but i would prefer the one with less accuracy issues and factors to adjust for(distance past ~20yards). 100's!

turkeynutz

  • Guest
Re: Broadhead grain'age question
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2009, 10:24:03 PM »
Im just starting bow hunting and my one of my buddies is tellin me to buy 100 grain and the other says 125 grain. Im shootin 350 arrows and pullin 65-70 pounds. Wich one do you recomend the best fit for 350 arrows? Would anything bad happen if i used 100's or 125's with 350 arrows?


I would go with a 2413 easton with 125g. 31" for deer killen. Like Tender says you will be wearen some arrow if you go with a weak one. Go to your local pro shop, they should have a break down chart for you to look at.

Offline bighoytman

  • Gut Pile B&C Freak
  • *****
  • Posts: 545
Re: Broadhead grain'age question
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2009, 02:39:53 PM »
Are you shooting the maximum 350 arrow?.Those are a good arrow with the front of center technology about 8.1 to 8.4 grains per inch. I would reckomend the 100 grains for your poundage.With todays trends for faster bows most people have switched over to carbon arrows.There lighter,stiffer and do not bend.The problem with a lighter arrow and the heavier head is it will effect arrow spine.If your shooting a 4 or 5 inch vane for fletching you should not have a problem with the 125's.I would stay away from the 125's if your shooting 1 1/2 to 3 inch fletchings due to making your front of center off balance with not enough weight in back to balance arrow out which will cause trouble with broadhead flight it shooting fixed blade heads.I shoot the maximum 350's sometimes with a 100 grain head and blazer vanes for hunting at 70lbs.With a good sharp broadhead and 65 to 70lbs. a very effective deer killing arrow.
you can run but you will only leave a blood trail

 


Facebook Comments